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Podcast transcript: Supercharging your home office network

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Podcast transcript: Supercharging your home office network

This automatically-generated transcript is taken from the IT Pro Podcast episode ‘Supercharging your home office network'. To listen to the full episode, click here. We apologise for any errors.

Adam Shepherd 

Hi, I'm Adam Shepherd.

Bobby Hellard 

And I'm Bobby Hellard.

Adam  

And you're listening to the IT Pro Podcast where this week, we're talking about how to beef up your home office networking, and why you should consider upgrading it in the first place.

Bobby  

Hybrid working is now a fact of life. But although this brings a range of benefits, it also means that our home networks need to be business-ready in order to support our modern digital working practices. Your existing broadband connections and wireless infrastructure might be fine for watching Netflix on the couch. But this doesn't mean it's capable of keeping up with cloud file sharing, back to back video calls and other bandwidth intensive tasks.

Adam  

Today, we're taking a look at why you may want to upgrade your home network to make it suitable for remote working, as well as how to go about beefing up your connectivity. We're joined by Darien Graham-Smith, associate editor of PC Pro, co host of the PC Pro Podcast and all around networking guru. Darien, it's a pleasure to have you back on the show.

Darien Graham-Smith 

It's a pleasure to be on the show. Hi, guys.

Adam  

So today we're gonna be talking about networks, which is, as I'm sure all our listeners will agree, one of the most interesting topics in the world when it comes to IT. But what is the most important thing to bear in mind when you're planning out a home office network?

Darien  

Well, I mean, that's a very good question. Because every, every business is different. And every home office is different. And even if you imagine that the classic, you know, the classic pandemic era home office has often been just a laptop on the table somewhere. It's not just about your own device, it's about the whole environment and what else is competing with it for bandwidth. And what it is that stands between your let's say, your MacBook, and the server in the office or the cloud server that contains your, your work or the Gmail account that you need to get to. And in that case, I'm talking about the router, and about the the Wi Fi or the wired connection that you have to it. And, of course, the broadband connection behind it. There is no single most important thing that that applies to all environments. And perhaps the first step should be to audit what you've got and work out, you know, just where the potential bottlenecks might be in your particular setup.

Adam  

I think that's one of the things that is very easy to forget, even for kind of seasoned networkers such as ourselves that networks are a, well, a network, funnily enough, of kind of interconnected devices and kind of infrastructures, and every element is sort of, to a certain extent, interreliant on on everything else, you know, you can't really look at a particular element in isolation.

Darien  

Yes, I mean, I think you may have been slightly tongue in cheek when you said networks were the most interesting aspects of computing. But I mean, it is definitely the case that no, no two networks are the same. There are network engineers who've been in the business for 30-40 years, and they will definitely tell you, every job is like a completely new learning experience to find out the ins and outs and the whys and wherefores of the particular way that all these things have been lashed together with Cat5 cable and so forth.

Adam  

Yeah, I was slightly tongue in cheek, but at the same time, I do find myself getting possibly more excited about networking than I do about kind of any other element of my own kind of personal IT, if you like. Anyone who follows me on Twitter will know that I recently sorted out my own home networking with wired connections throughout my house for the first time in like a year and a half, since I've moved into my current place. And it's just been an absolute revelation. So I've taken much joy in kind of plugging all my various hardwired things into kind of cat6 connections and watching watching my speeds, you know, triple and quadruple. So speaking of which, then what do our own kind of home office networks look like? Because we've been doing the whole remote working thing for at least two years now. So we should have, should have had a decent amount of time to sort of get a setup that works for us, Bobby, what is your network look like at the moment?

Bobby  

Well, it's pretty standard, I think it's what you'd find in most homes. To be honest with you, I'm in that bracket of people that probably didn't think too much about their broadband set up until we were all forced to work from home, I remember the, you know the first couple of months of lockdown where we were only allowed to go to the shops for certain items? I actually broke a part of my connection with my couch, moving it all around. So I had to run into, I think it was Sainsbury's and Argos to find an ADSL filter because I'd smashed it on the foot of the chair. That was like two days of panic where I thought I'm not gonna be able to work. But yeah, I'm at the other end of the scale compared to you guys; I probably don't think about as much as I probably should.

Adam  

Darien, what about you?

Darien  

Well, I've been working from home for just over seven years now. So I've had some time to really evolve my setup. At the back end of it, I've got a Virgin broadband. It's a domestic one. I think a lot of us these days are working on domestic lines, which is, which is fine as far as it goes. But you don't have an SLA. You know, it depends on if you're doing something critical, if the boss is really expecting you to be available and on call and so forth, you might need to think about having a fallback internet connection. Even if that's as simple as tethering an Android phone. Current Asus routers let you connect an Android phone via USB and use it as a fallback. Yeah, it's a very nice, neat solution. So if your, if your ISP goes down, you can seamlessly just switch over. But I haven't had to do that yet. So I think that's that's the sort of thing where you can probably, like most people can muddle through, don't take that as business class advice. It's just an observation. So I've got a I've got a fibre to my home. It's 200 megabits. Now, truthfully, I don't need that much to do my work. I've allowed that to creep up and it's useful a couple of times a month, one of the things I do is I download large ISOs for PC Pro, which then gets extracted, and we put them on the web for subscribers to download bonus software and so forth. Some of those are like eight gigabytes in size. And it's nice, it's not necessary, but it's nice to be able to download those in a matter of minutes rather than hours. The thing to look out for there, though, is like most domestic lines, mine is asymmetric. So I download it. And that's all fine and dandy. And I can extract when I need to and make sure it's all in the right shape. Then when I come to upload it, that's more like an hour's wait. Yeah. And this is fine. It's just, you know, to be honest, you know, only a couple of years ago, that would have been considered pretty good. And a lot of it is quality of life stuff rather than this necessity. So what I've landed on 200 megabits for now, and doubtless when my contract expires, they'll they'll try to shunt me up to 500. And if if history is any guide, I'll probably fall for it.

Adam  

Yeah, I I'm on a 500 500 megabit line. And I have to admit, I am an absolute sucker for the whole, you know, monkey brain, big number good thing. Yeah, I objectively do not need 500 meg in order to get things done. But again, it is it's it's nice to have, it's nice to have the the security of knowing that we've got more bandwidth and more speeds than than we could ever possibly need.

Darien

Yeah, one other use case, actually, I should mention is if you're working, as I do with some clients, using shared cloud drives - sorry, I should say synced cloud drives, that's the key part. The faster your connection, obviously, the more likely it is that at any given point, you're going to have the latest version of everything, and your latest versions of everything will have successfully uploaded. 99% of the time it's marginal and the big file that someone edited this morning will have had plenty of time to come down onto your computer. But for example, you do get cases where I might quickly finish off something, hit Save, close up my laptop, leave the house, the faster your line is, the less likely it is that something's going to slip through the cracks. Anyway, so I haven't even got really into my house yet in terms of my home network. Now I use a mesh system, I use a Netgear Orbi mesh system, which is, again, not necessary for my work, there's many, many ways I could do it. And I could use a normal router, because it so happens that my home office is directly above the living room where the line comes in. So I could quite happily use Wi Fi to connect straight through the floor, that would be no problem at all. But I do use an Orbi system, because my home extends some way behind that. And it's just nice. Again, it's a quality of life thing. I don't really do any work in the bedroom or the bathroom, but I'm a human being. And I like to, you know, I like to have decent speed, consistent Internet access everywhere. That is overkill for most people. And in particular, it is enormously overkill what I have, because at the moment, I'm doing a long term test of the Netgear Orbi, Wi Fi 6e system. So I've got 6Ghz networking going on in my home, which is fine and dandy, and it does give me some good speeds, the system costs £1,500. And truthfully, I think I would notice absolutely zero difference if I were using something like, I've just been trying out the TP Link Deco X90 system, which costs £400, and is really just as fast for almost like almost every intent and purpose, there's a couple of places where the Orbi is about 10 megabytes a second faster. But really, all of this is way, way, way above the practicality threshold. But the thing about the Orbi is it has very fast 4.8 gigabits per second backhaul between its three stations, and each station also has 2.5 Gigabit Ethernet. So what I can do is, I've got an Orbi node sitting in my study, my home office. And that is connected via ultra fast link to the main unit. And then I have a wired connection from that to my desktop. I actually have a desktop PC I use for most of my work from home. And we're not really here to talk about ergonomics, but I do find having a full size keyboard and full size monitor just non negotiable as a full time home worker.

Darien  

And I you mentioned that wired. Wired is still like it has many, many advantages over over any kind of wireless connection. And even though the backbone of what I'm doing is wireless, I did my own tests. And it was just silly how much smoother and consistently fast it was for me to copy files back and forth to a local NAS drive connected to the main router, using a wired connection to the Orbi station and reducing the number of wireless hops, reducing the amount of wireless that happens. Incidentally, because it's 2.5 Gigabit Ethernet on the Orbi system, I thought I might as well take advantage of that. I've got a Mac Mini which I use as my main system at the moment, that only has gigabit Ethernet. But you can buy a USB 2.5 Gigabit Ethernet Adapter for literally 30 quid off Amazon, have it arrive next day and just plug in and go. And it really does, it really does raise the roof, even if you are you would think that you're that you would look at the speeds that you're getting. And think there's nothing to be gained here because they are well below the gigabit boundary. But actually it does appear, and this is kind of anecdotal, but I think every network engineer will it will know it, that even when you seem to be well within the headroom of a wired connection, increasing its bandwidth can often magically give a boost even within that envelope.

Bobby  

So at what point should we start thinking about adding network switches?

Darien  

Um, well, I mean, that's that's another very, very subjective question. And the nice thing about switches which maybe isn't quite so well known, is that you can and take a single 2.5 Gigabit Ethernet connection on a router. I'm focusing on 2.5 gigabit, by the way, because that's coming up quite a lot in domestic gear now, which I think home workers are likely to have; 10 gig Ethernet has been quite standard in bigger businesses for a long time. And you also get 25 and 40 gigabit cards now, but 2.5 seems to be the one that's coming into the home space. And there's a lot of routers and mesh systems now coming out, which just have one 2.5 Gigabit Ethernet connector. And this is not all that useful, because obviously, you can't have use one socket to have two devices talking at 2.5 Gigabit Ethernet speeds, because one of them has to go into a slower socket, but you can hang a two and a half Gigabit Ethernet switch off that single socket. And suddenly you've got like five or eight or however many available two and a half gigabit connections. So it really can like lift the speed limit on your network. That said, as I think we've you know, we keep coming back to, it's really easy to get sucked into the idea that more speed is always better. And that's it's always nicer, perhaps, but it's not necessary. And it does cost money. I recently bought a two and a half Gigabit Ethernet switch for myself, it was about 100 quid, and I thought I very nice. Yeah, I thought that was a pretty good deal. But you can buy a gigabit switch for £15 now. So if your employer is not reimbursing you for your infrastructure, it might be an easy decision. So I mean, really the answer is you should buy a switch, when you have more things that you want to wire than, than you have sockets. You can also use I think maybe Adam, you mentioned you did this, perhaps I'm remembering wrong, you can also use a switch as a sort of ad hoc, just physical extension, because the problem. The problem with wired networking is of course, you very few of us, I'm going to stick my head out and say none of us live in homes, which were originally designed, you know, with with Ethernet or fibre cabling, like it's sunk into the walls, as many offices are designed, or at least they're designed to accommodate that. And so why why networking is often too much of an inconvenience for home workers to bother with it. But if it's helpful at all, like if you have multiple rooms that that want serving, then if you can, for example, tuck a switch somewhere on a landing or in a hallway, then that can be a convenient hub from which other wired connections fan out.

Adam  

And and I have indeed done that. I did end up using a PoE switch. But I think this, this raises an interesting question of whether or not it's worth using wired connections, rather than wireless connections, because I think most people, because it's so convenient, and all the rest of it kind of gravitate towards wireless connections, by default for everything from kind of, you know, laptops and PCs, and all of that kind of stuff all the way through to printers and those kinds of general office peripherals that you might have. Like Bobby, for example, I'm assuming that the vast majority of your networking is wireless rather than wired. 

Bobby  

Yeah. Correct.

Adam  

Is it then kind of switching some of that over to wired connections?

Darien  

I'm sorry to keep on kind of playing the, the piece of string card but I mean, really, when you say is it worth it? In some situations it might be, in some situations it might not. The key thing is to really understand what the difference is. The received wisdom, the assumption has been for a very long time that wired will always be faster than wireless. But it's been true for for almost the entirety of the existence of wireless networks. However, we're in a situation now where although the bar is raised is rising, the vast vast majority of domestic routers out there have got Gigabit Ethernet. But Wi Fi six is becoming the standard and a good new modern Wi Fi six chipset can actually outperform a gigabit Ethernet connection for short range burst transmissions. So and if you move up to Wi Fi 6e, 6e doesn't actually raise the maximum speed of Wi Fi, but it does move into a much less congested frequency range, so you're less likely to have problems with interference, so you're more likely to get the maximum speed or get higher speeds over a longer range. So if your priority is speed, then it's possible that actually sticking with Wi Fi, if not, will be better, at least might be closer to wired speeds than you might expect. The thing about thing about Ethernet is it's much more stable and consistent than Wi Fi, with the best will in the world Wi Fi is kind of designed to to, it's designed to acknowledge that packets are going to get dropped and things are going to need retransmitting; there is absolutely no guarantee of performance over Wi Fi. To be fair, there's no guarantee of performance over Ethernet either. But in practice, if you look at a network metre, and just look at the throughput and look at the graph, and see how the speeds are oscillating all over the place over Wi Fi compared to what will be a much much much steadier graph over wired networking, the strengths and weaknesses of both are very obvious. Now normally, it doesn't really matter. Because things like you know, Zoom are designed to, to work in a wireless worlds, they buffer, they degrade gracefully. So if the if the connection drops its bit rates abruptly for short periods and comes back up, you may not even notice, it's all dealt with very cleverly. But the more you're reliant on your, your network, and the more you're reliant on something being available, running smoothly, completing in a predictable time, the more the attraction of wired networking becomes obvious.

Adam  

And I think for home workers in particular, outside of a couple of specific kind of industries and use cases like for example, media and entertainment or graphics professionals where you're likely to be downloading and uploading large quantities of quite dense files, you know, video files and all that kind of stuff on a regular basis. For quote, unquote, the average home worker, where most of what you're likely to be doing is working with SaaS tools, working with video conferencing suites, working with kind of cloud file sharing all that kind of thing, I would argue that stability really is far and away the the most important metric rather than kind of raw speed. And in that situation, that's where Ethernet, I think, for me really comes into its own. And I think that's where Ethernet is kind of often a bit overlooked by people kind of kicking out home workers by businesses kind of kicking out home workers and kind of

Darien  

Because I mean, like I was saying with Zoom, everything has been designed for a wireless world, so you won't normally see big problems. Even if you're using a flaky Wi Fi five connection. Even if you're using a flaky Wi Fi four connection, it's very likely that you can get your work done and you won't, you won't have to apologise to your boss for not being able to join a call or not being able to upload a spreadsheet. So I don't want to give people the idea necessarily that they need to completely forsake Wi Fi and they need to rip up the floorboards and run cat6 everywhere. But I would say you know, given the choice, my top choice if if everything were achievable and free. Right now I would definitely go with 2.5 Gigabit Ethernet wired almost almost everything in my home except you know, laptops and mobile phones where the whole point is that they are well mobile. But you know, if you want to know what what standard you accept, look at the standard that you that you walk past. I haven't actually implemented that myself except in the one; well, there's only two two and a half gig Ethernet links in my house for real. One, as I say, connects my desktop to an Orbi station. The other one downstairs connects the other Orbi station to a NAS appliance. That's the that's the situation where the big big files that you mentioned, most often, you know that the backups go and so on. Obviously, I think it's worth it for that. But otherwise, you know, if if your employer will fund two and a half gig or five gig or 10 gig Ethernet throughout your home, if it can be done in a way that fits your lifestyle and fits your your architecture, that's brilliant. If not, you know, depending on your use case, it might not be, you know, it might not not be a deal breaker in terms of working from home.

Adam  

So, Bobby, have you had the urge over the last kind of couple of years to do any kind of network upgrades at all? 

Bobby  

No, I can't say I have, mostly because what I do isn't that intensive. I think the only times I've wished that done something properly is when it drops out. Because quite common now Virgin Media, you get days of downtime. I mean, yesterday, it dropped out for the morning, and I just had to use my mobile data, and tether it. But yeah, I haven't, haven't had the urge to do any physical, like rig networking or anything like that.

Adam  

And again, I think that that comes back to the point where we're saying around stability. And I can imagine actually saying that, it must be very frustrating for people that have put a large amount of time and effort and investment into, you know, kitting themselves out with a lot of very intensive network upgrades for their home office, only to have their internet service provider kind of drop the ball on them.

Darien  

As I mentioned before, I mentioned Asus routers, because they have the very neat ability to connect an Android phone and just but there are many routers, which will accept a USB 4g dongle, as they say. And you can plug that in, and you can set the router to use it as a failover. So you won't even necessarily know that your internet line has gone down except that probably it will be a little bit slower. If you think about what companies do businesses, responsible businesses will definitely have a backup line at all times. There's no particular reason why we should imagine we can work from home and not have similar fail safes. You know, if we if we're going to tell our employers, we are able to do the job remotely, then it's kind of on us to make sure that that that's actually true. It's definitely worth considering. But I think it's important that you at least audit what you have and what your options are. And look at I mean, for example, Bobby, you say that you've had problems before with your your ISP in your area. Just set your expectations and your employer's expectations realistically about what your availability is going to be and know what your plan is for dealing with unexpected outages because they perceive happen.

Bobby  

There's one thing we kept reporting on in the first year of the pandemic was that these outages would become more common because more people are obviously working from home and it was more pressure on the networks. Is that still likely to be the case that we're gonna see more and more frequent outages, I guess?

Darien  

I mean, I haven't personally noticed in the past 12 months as things have kind of been oscillating back and forth. But things seem to have been much more stable. I mean, you know, the people talk all the time about one of the whole benefits of the cloud is scalability and obviously that doesn't necessarily apply to ISPs. But I think I gather, you're talking about the entire infrastructure that we use, the back ends, the cloud services, all of that. I think, you know, I don't want to be overconfident but it seems like they quite quickly got a handle on what the the maximum likely number of people working at home or demanding to use Zoom at once or demanding to stick their things on AWS at once was. So fingers crossed, we should have had now a great kind of a great realisation of what the what the parameters are in this brave new world. Again, you cannot rely absolutely on any kind of suggestion that some problem is now solved, and outages or problems will not recur again. But I think I'd say to an employer who was worried about that, I would say, any business, which is still in 2022, having regular outages, just because they can't cope with the number of people using their service is going to go out of business. It's not a viable way to operate anymore.

Adam  

Just going back to your point around setting employer expectations, Darien, Bobby, prior to this recording, you were mentioning a guy you spoke to last year that did effectively set up his own kind of edge infrastructure in his house to kind of address this problem.

Bobby  

Yes, this is an IT consultant who lives about 10 miles outside of Chicago, in farmlands, he's got a farm house. And it's also in like a valley. So he basically had very little connection, and he had to sort of piece together four different services just to get some kind of operation and he had like servers in his basement and so forth. But any sort of other use from anyone else in the family, like his daughter or his, his partner would just cut the connection out for him completely. But he was talking about a router he had that would select the most, the strongest connection at any one time to keep them sort of online for a steady amount of time.

Darien  

This actually brings me on to something that we touched on at the very start and haven't, haven't yet been back to. And so we were talking about one of the issues with making your home network fit for business is that ordinarily, your computer that you use for work is not going to be the only device competing for resources. There will be you know, someone watching Netflix downstairs, or there will be, there'll be something downloading on someone's bedroom PC. Many, many routers, I would go as far as to say, even in the world of domestic routers, unless you're going down to the absolute dirt cheap ones. They have QOS settings, they have quality of service options, which should allow you to prioritise specific devices and often specific services. And without doing anything else to your network, you may be able to just dive into the settings and say this work PC should always get traffic priority over everything else in the network, no matter what happens. And voice calls or video calls should always get priority over everything else. That's actually sometimes set up by default anyway, because it makes sense. And you may well find if you're if you're having stuttering, at the moment, you may well find that just ticking those two boxes and hitting apply is all it takes to completely transform your experience, it will of course have an effect on everybody else's experience. But services even like Netflix, which obviously demands a lot of bandwidth, they're designed to buffer as I said before, they're designed for the Wi Fi world, they don't expect to have the fastest smoothest connection all the time. So that can be a completely free way of getting a lift. I should say the only exception is probably if you've got a console gamer in your home who will themselves want to have the lowest latency and the maximum bandwidth, I expect, but frankly, if you're working and they're playing, I think I know who needs it more. 

Adam  

Well, quite. And I can imagine that's probably an issue, what would it being half term as we record that a number of our listeners will be having to contend with in terms of bandwidth sharing. But it's a it's a really good point around double checking your kind of network settings and your router settings. I would imagine most of the kind of networking professionals listening will be already very familiar with the specific settings of their particular router or network infrastructure. But for anyone who hasn't dived into the back end of their router, it's absolutely worth having a poke around in the kind of management console of your particular equipment, instructions for which can usually be found on the device itself. But it's very worth poking around to see what the options are. Whether or not there's any additional features or services you can enable to really get the best out of your equipment and to make sure that it's performing up to your specific needs. There's quite often traffic routing settings and various things like that which can be used to to really maximise the performance and in a lot of cases, the manufacturers are, I think, quite bad at explaining that these features exist in the first place. So yeah.

Darien  

Yeah, I think the problem is that the back end, the web console, or even the smartphone app increasingly, that you use to manage your router is put together by engineers rather than, rather than communications experts. So yeah, you may well find that everything you need is right there. But it's buried under a system, under a menu called something like, you know, adaptive QoS, that you'd, you'd never click on unless you'd already Googled what it means.

Adam  

Yeah, absolutely. It can be quite intimidating, some of the manufacturers' back ends, if you like.

Darien  

But let us not, having said that, that we should not be discouraging anyone from diving in. Because in many cases, it's actually once you, once you get in there, it's quite clear what's what, so I would absolutely encourage everybody, even if your network seems fine, to go in and see what options are available, because there might be all sorts of gains you can have for free, not just performance, but security, for example, you might be able to turn on malicious site blocking or DDoS defence, there's all sorts of stuff built into modern routers that you wouldn't necessarily expect if you're just using them as a conduit to your ISP.

Bobby  

So for those that are considering improvements to their networking, what are the sort of first steps they can take?

Darien  

Well, the first one obviously is find, identify what exactly it is you want to gain from improving, I mean, is your, are you finding that your Zoom calls are breaking up and your files are taking forever to sync? If so then, you know, it's quite likely you don't need to buy anything new, you may well be able to get the result you need by checking the the settings on your router, checking what is interfering with your with your experience. And also obviously checking the backend checking the problem isn't that you're still using a five megabits dial up connection. And then really just for home workers, we keep, we keep sort of coming back to this, there's a big dichotomy between the best network you can have, and one which is practical, and in particular, affordable, if you're not having someone fund it for you. So really, it's a case of targeting your, your upgrades where they're going to make a difference. As a rule, I would say the single biggest change that I have seen, is buying a new router, you need to check your clients. Obviously, if you've got an older laptop, it might only have Wi Fi five, Wi Fi six will be faster in most cases. There's not much point buying, you know, a brand new Wi Fi six router if you're still gonna connect to over a Wi Fi five connection. And that's the sort of thing that you really need to be looking at it's, it's identifying that where the bottleneck is or where the problem is, and, and investing smartly, intelligently and in a focused way, because you're not with the best will in the world going to replace your entire home network with a 40 gigabit fibre set up or at least if you are, I'm afraid you're outside of my field of expertise.

Adam  

Yeah, I'm sure in an ideal world, many of our listeners would replace all of their networking with 4040 Gig fibre in a heartbeat. But it's one of those things much like buying a sports car, you don't really need it for your day to day, it's just a cool thing to have.

Darien  

The other thing that actually I just like to wrap up with is, you know, I've been I've been getting a bit excited about Wi Fi 6e. And in fact, I've been getting a bit excited about the latest generation of Wi Fi six routers, which really the cap on performance, I've seen nearly 150 megabytes a second over Wi Fi six, wow. Yeah, which is incredible. It's way faster than then you can get over Gigabit Ethernet. But it's really important to remember that in the most for the most part. Now I think Adam, you're in a slightly different position previously, for the most part, your internet connection is almost always going to be narrower than your home network. So look there first, if you are working remotely, it is quite likely that that's that's the upgrade that's going to make the most difference to your professional productivity. Other stuff like moving files around and so on. That's, that's up to you. But the back end, that the bottleneck is almost always at that point.

Adam  

Indeed, well on that nugget of wisdom. I'm afraid that's all we've got time for on this week's show. But thanks once again to Darien Graham-Smith for joining us.

Darien  

A pleasure. Thank you for having me.

Bobby  

You can find links to all the topics we've spoken about today in the show notes and even more on our website at itpro.co.uk

Adam  

You can also follow us on social media as well as subscribe to our daily newsletter.

Bobby  

Don't forget to subscribe to the podcast wherever you find your podcasts. And if you're enjoying the show, leave us a rating and a review.

Adam  

We'll be back next week with more analysis from the world of IT. But until then, goodbye. 

Bobby  

Goodbye.

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Should you take your password manager off the internet?

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